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It’s Time for ALEs to “Do the Math” on Controlled Group Status

Applicable Large Employers (ALEs) subject to the ACA’s employer shared responsibility and reporting duties are running out of time in which to ascertain whether or not they are part of an “Aggregated ALE Group,” the members of which are treated as a single employer for benefit plan and certain ACA purposes. This in turn requires an analysis under Internal Revenue Code controlled group rules, as discussed below.

A definitive answer to the question of aggregated group status is required in order to file the Form 1094-C transmittal for employee statements (Forms 1095-C), which is due in hard copy by May 31, 2016, or via e-filing by June 30, 2016. (E-filing is encouraged for all ALEs but is mandated for those filing 250 or more Form 1095-C employee statements).

Specifically, Part II of Form 1094-C, line 21 asks whether the “ALE Member” filing the Form is part of an “Aggregated ALE Group,” and if the answer is yes, the ALE Member must identify, in Part III, the name and EIN of all other ALE Members of the Aggregated ALE Group.  Form 1094-C, like other IRS forms, must be signed under penalty of perjury.

Some ALEs with fewer than 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalents (FTEs), are subject to employer shared responsibility only because they are part of an Aggregated ALE Group that collectively employs 50 or more full-time/FTE employees (or, in 2015, 100 or more).

Larger employers that have always had 100 or more full-time/FTE employees of their own may also have had to determine their status as part of an Aggregated ALE Group in order to determine who should furnish Form 1095-C employee statements for employees who worked for more than one aggregated employer during the same calendar month. (Generally the employer for whom the employee worked the most hours of service would be considered the reporting employer for that month.)

In either situation, these ALEs should already know that they are members of an Aggregated ALE Group and be in a position to identify other members of the Group on Part III of Form 1094-C.

However, employers that have always had 100 or more full-time/FTE employees of their own, and who have not shared employees with other group members as described above, may not have had occasion to determine whether or not they are part of an Aggregated ALE Group with other companies related in ownership. Now they must do so in order to accurately complete Form 1094-C.

In addition to Form 1094-C reporting duties, accurate knowledge of controlled group status is necessary in the event an ALE is subject to excise tax penalties under Internal Revenue Code (“Code”) § 4980H(a).  Before applying the excise tax rate ($270 per month, in 2016) to all full-time employees, the ALE may subtract the first 30 full-time employees.  That “budget” of 30 excludible full-time employees (80, in 2015) must be allocated among members of the Aggregated ALE Group in proportion to their total number of full-time employees.[1]

The three types of Aggregated ALE Groups are:

  • a “controlled group” consisting solely of corporations as defined under Code § 414(b);
  • a group of trades or businesses that includes partnerships and LLCs, that are under “common control” as defined under Code § 414(c); or
  • businesses, usually professional service organizations, that together form an “affiliated service group” (ASG) as defined under Code § 414(m).

The controlled group/common control/ASG rules (collectively, the “common control rules”) have applied for benefit plan purposes for many years but they have achieved new prominence under the ACA employer shared responsibility and ALE reporting rules. Determining whether or not common control exists requires identification and analysis of the relevant facts and application of the law to them, in the form of the above-cited Code sections, related Treasury Regulations, other agency guidance and federal case law.  The rules governing common control status are complex and can require a significant amount of factual digging, including when business ownership interests are held by family members or in trust, and where ownership interests must be traced through several layers of entity ownership.  Applicable large employers that share ownership with other business entities, particularly those with employees, and that have not already ascertained their common control status for ACA purposes, are encouraged to get this process started without further delay.

 

[1] Although aggregated group status is used to determine status as an ALE, and in order to allocate the budget of 30 excludible full-time employees, excise tax liability is determined separately for each ALE member within the group.

 

ACA Reporting for Large Employers: Top 10 Rules for Success

Applicable Large Employers have approximately one month, until March 31, 2016,  to furnish Form 1095-C to full-time employees in relation to group health coverage offered (or not offered) in 2015.  Self-insured employers must also provide Form 1095-Cs to part-time employees who were covered under their plans in 2015.  Related IRS filing deadlines (transmittal Form 1094-C and attached Forms 1095-C) come later in the year, but the March 31, 2016 deadline to furnish employee statements is hard and final.  The attached PowerPoint presentation lists the Top 10 Rules for Success in completing Applicable Large Employer reporting, and includes bonus tips on opt-out payments, and increased ACA penalty amounts for 2015 and 2016.

Reason to Celebrate: IRS Extends ACA Reporting Deadlines

On December 28, 2015, the IRS gave Applicable Large Employers (“ALEs”) a last-minute extension of their 2015 ACA reporting deadlines via Notice 2016-4.  The original and new, extended deadlines, which apply only to reporting for 2015, are as follows:

Capture ACA II.JPGThe same extensions apply to providers of minimum essential coverage such as insurance carriers and government-sponsored programs (Medicare, Medicaid), who are required to file Form 1094-B and furnish statements to covered individuals on Form 1095-B.  Employers generally are not required to perform minimum essential coverage reporting although, as discussed in this prior post, there are circumstances under which it is required.

The extended deadlines are hard deadlines to which the IRS will not apply automatic and permissive extensions of time that would otherwise be available. Notice 2016-4 also functions as the Service’s response to any pending extension requests, which will not be formally granted.  Reporting penalties will apply for failure to timely file returns or furnish statements but the IRS may abate penalties on a demonstration of “reasonable cause”; in this regard the employer’s “reasonable efforts” to prepare for timely reporting will be taken into account as will efforts to comply for 2016.  Although not exactly clear from the Notice it would appear that the IRS is still offering penalty relief for timely filed and/or furnished but incomplete or incorrect returns and/or statements, where the filer can show that it made good faith efforts to provide complete and correct information.    Further clarification on that point would be helpful.

As has often been the case with ACA relief, this extension is offered so close to the original compliance deadlines that some ALEs may not need or even be operationally able to take full advantage of it, and the Notice makes clear that the IRS will be prepared to accept ACA returns beginning in January 2016. However even those ALEs that had already invested substantial time and money in fulfilling the original reporting and statement deadlines were struggling with the complexity of the forms and reporting codes, and the extension will allow for a less frenzied and hopefully more accurate reporting process. The extension will be even more welcome to the many employers who qualified for pay or play relief applicable to ALEs with 50 to 99 full-time employees, including full-time equivalents, and who may only now be learning of their 2015 reporting duties.

 

ACA Reporting Update: New Procedures for Requesting Family Member SSNs

In Notice 2015-68, issued September 17, 2015, the IRS has modified the steps that must be followed by insurance carriers and self-insured employers to demonstrate a “reasonable effort” to obtain Social Security Numbers or other Tax Identification Numbers (collectively, TIN) for family members enrolled in Minimum Essential Coverage (MEC), and has requested public comment on further adjustments to the requirements. Pending future guidance, following the new procedures will entitle the reporting party to “reasonable cause” relief from penalties for late or incomplete tax returns and employee statements.

Internal Revenue Code § 6055 requires that, among other information, TINs for individuals who are enrolled in MEC be reported by MEC providers. Insurance carriers (issuers) report to insureds via IRS Form 1095-B and self-insured employers report to full-time employees on Section III of IRS Form 1095-C. (Forms 1095-B and 1095-C are transmitted to the IRS under Forms 1094-B and 1094-C, respectively. The IRS issued final 2015 versions of these forms, and instructions for same, also on September 17, 2015.) If the reporting party follows the “reasonable effort” steps to obtain a family member SSN/TIN without success, it may report a date of birth for that individual on the applicable form without penalty.

The new steps required to be followed in order to demonstrate that a reasonable effort has been made to obtain an enrolled family member’s SSN/TIN are as follows:

  1. The initial request is made at the time the individual first enrolls or, if the person is already enrolled on September 17, 2015, the next open enrollment period;
  2. The second request is made at “a reasonable time thereafter” and
  3. The third request is made by December 31 of the year following the initial request.

This sequence replaces the sequence described in the preamble to final regulations under Code § 6055: initial request made when an account is opened or a relationship established, first annual request made by December 31 of the same year (or, if the initial request was made in December, by January 31 of the following year), and second annual request made by December 31 of the following year. The Notice states that that this sequence, which was lifted directly from regulations under Code § 6724, the “reasonable cause” relief statute, prompted concerns among reporting parties that it was not practical in the context of MEC reporting.

Until further guidance, it remains the case that reporting a date of birth in one year does not eliminate the need to make the necessary follow-up requests as described in the Notice.