Coming close on the heels of expansion of the CalSavers program to businesses with 5 or more employees, which went into effect on June 30, 2022, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law a further expansion of the CalSavers program on August 26, 2022, in the form of Senate Bill 1126.  Under this new measure, as of December 31, 2025, businesses with one (1) employee or more must either enroll in the CalSavers program, or sponsor a retirement plan.

This sweeps into the CalSavers regime even micro-businesses like home-based Etsy shops, food trucks, and the like.  Expressly excluded from the expansion are sole proprietorships, self-employed individuals, or other business entities that do not employ any individuals other than owners of the business (a company that employs two spouses, who each own half of the company’s stock, would be one example).

For these very small businesses, enrolling in CalSavers may be preferable to establishing even the simplest format retirement plan, due to the complexities of administering these plans, and the very inflexible rules for the IRA-based retirement plans (SIMPLE and SEP arrangements).  We covered some of the potential pitfalls of setting up a plan in our earlier post. 

That said, the financial services industry is increasingly reaching out to smaller employers with app-based service packages that allow a business owner to establish a 401(k) plan online, with “just a few clicks.”  No matter how easy it is to establish, a 401(k) plan is still a 50+ page written contract that is governed by two federal agencies (Department of Labor and Internal Revenue Service) and caution is advised.  With the proper prior planning, a SIMPLE, SEP, or 401(k) plan can be a powerful means of attracting and retaining employees and a good strategic move for even the smallest business.  But knowing what you are getting into, is key.   The persons vending the plan services may not be your best source of knowledge as to what can go wrong.  Stay on the safe side and check with an expert – either a CPA with retirement plan experience, a 401(k) plan third party administrator, or an ERISA attorney, before you sign plan documentation. 

Finally, classifying someone as an independent contractor to avoid the 1-employee threshold is not a good idea in California, where the criteria for independent contractor are quite narrow.  If you have questions in that regard, check with the California Department of Industrial Relations, or with a qualified employment law attorney.

The above information is a brief summary of legal developments that is provided for general guidance only and does not create an attorney-client relationship between the author and the reader. Readers are encouraged to seek individualized legal advice in regard to any particular factual situation. © 2022 Christine P. Roberts, all rights reserved.

Photo credit: Anthony Persegol, Unsplash

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