The Inflation Reduction Act, H.R. 5376 stands poised for passage in the House and includes almost $80 billion in new funding for the Internal Revenue Service, of which almost $46 billion is allocated to “enforcement,” including determination and collection of taxes, legal and litigation support. What is not clear at this juncture is how much of that massive amount of new funding will trickle down to the Tax Exempt and Government Entities Division, which has oversight over retirement plans, the employers that sponsor retirement plans, and IRAs. IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig has stated in letters to both houses of Congress that the rates of auditing households making under $400,000 per year will not increase despite the new funding, but that the resources will enable “meaningful, impactful examinations of large corporate and high-net-worth taxpayers.” Whether this includes examinations of large corporate and high-net-worth taxpayer retirement plans and IRAs is uncertain.

A breakdown of the new IRS funding, which is set forth in Title I, Subtitle A, Part 3 of the Act, is set forth below.

Section 10301. Enhancement of Internal Revenue Service Resources.

It seems hard to imagine that some portion of the enforcement budget won’t ultimately increase plan audit activity. The IRS only recently announced a new plan enforcement initiative in the form of a 90-day Pre-Examination Compliance Pilot program (click on June 3, 2022 to display the program announcement). Under this new program, IRS will send a letter to a plan sponsor notifying them that their retirement plan has been selected for an examination. The letter gives the plan sponsor a 90-day window of time to review their plan’s documentation, and operations, for compliance with applicable law. If errors are noted, they may be eligible for self-correction under the terms of Revenue Procedure 2021-30. Errors that are not eligible for self-correction can be corrected under a closing agreement, with the Voluntary Correction Program fee structure forming a basis to determine the sanction amount that the IRS will impose. If the plan sponsor fails to respond to the IRS within 90 days of the letter, the IRS will contact the sponsor to schedule an exam. Since this audit initiative starts with a simple letter, there would now seem to be ample funds at IRS to pursue this agenda – in fact, postage is one of the expressly sanctioned expenses under Operations Support. Even without a specific funding line-item for TE/GE, plan sponsors should be on their guard in this new era of IRS funding.

The author thanks Peter Gulia, Fiduciary Guidance Counsel, and other colleagues at the Benefitslink Message Boards for sharing their thoughts about the new IRS funding.

The above information is a brief summary of legal developments that is provided for general guidance only and does not create an attorney-client relationship between the author and the reader. Readers are encouraged to seek individualized legal advice in regard to any particular factual situation. © 2022 Christine P. Roberts, all rights reserved.

Photo credit:  Mathieu Stern, Unsplash

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s